The 2013 Trollope Prize Winners

The members of the Trollope Prize committee at the University of Kansas are pleased to announce the winners of the 2013 Trollope Prize.

The winner of the graduate competition is Andrew R. Lallier, a graduate student at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, for his essay entitled "Battles over bits and diamonds: sanction, pragmatic pursuit and civil society in Trollope's The Eustace Diamonds." Lallier will receive a $2000 honorarium. In addition, his essay will be published by The Fortnightly Review, which has also provided an additional monetary reward.

The judges of this year's contest found the winning essay to be an ambitious and sophisticated reading of civil society, informed by nineteenth-century thinkers such as Hegel and Carlyle and applied with astute close reading to the novel. Commending Lallier for a masterful synthesis of recent work on the topic of Trollope and liberalism and for his original analysis of how Trollope's formally experimental novel offers a window onto Victorian political discourse, the judges found the essay to offer insight not only into nineteenth-century civil society and law but also into the genre of realism as Trollope practiced it.

Honorable mention in the graduate competition goes to "Turning Mourning: Trollope's Ambivalent Widows," written by Kaelin B.C. Alexander, a graduate student at Cornell University.

The winning essay in the undergraduate competition is "Performative Realism: Anti-Romantic Theatrics in Anthony Trollope's Framley Parsonage," written by Emily Halliwell-MacDonald of the University of Toronto. Halliwell-MacDonald will receive a $1000 honorarium. Her essay will also be the first winning entry by an undergraduate to be published by The Fortnightly Review, which has provided an additional monetary reward. Halliwell-MacDonald's essay was sponsored by Kai Hainer, who will receive a $500 award for her mentorship of this undergraduate student. The panel of judges commended Halliwell-MacDonald's essay for its use of key concepts from performance theory to discuss the theatricality of Lucy's anti-romantic self as well as Trollope's creation of a narrator who is also a performed persona.

The judges also recognized Franziska Tsufim's essay, "'The Staircase Was Fairyland': Anthony Trollope and the Culture of Advertising," for an honorable mention in the undergraduate competition. Tsufim is a student at the University of Haifa. The essay was sponsored by Ayelet Ben-Yishai.

The judges for this year's competition were Talia Schaffer, Professor of English at Queens College CUNY and the Graduate Center CUNY, Dorice Williams Elliott, Associate Professor of English at the University of Kansas, and Lauren M.E. Goodlad, Associate Professor of English and Director of the Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. The winner of the graduate contest was decided by all three judges; Elliott and Goodlad judged the undergraduate competition. All entries in the competition were read and judged anonymously with respect to both the entrants' names and their institutional affiliations.

The Trollope Prize is administered by the English department at the University of Kansas, with support from the Hall Center for the Humanities. It is awarded annually to the best undergraduate and graduate essays in English on the works of Anthony Trollope. The Prize was established to focus attention on Trollope's work and career; though he is one of the most important writers in the Victorian period and in the history of the novel, his novels are often overlooked today. The Prize is designed to help promote the study of Trollope in college classrooms and to encourage student engagement with both Trollope's work and Victorian literary history through their own intensive research and writing.

Please see our website -- http://trollopeprize.ku.edu -- for more information on the Prize, or e-mail any questions to trollopeprize@ku.edu.



The 2012 Trollope Prize Winner

The members of the Trollope Prize committee at the University of Kansas are pleased to announce the winners of the 2012 Trollope Prize.

The winner of the graduate competition is Rebecca Richardson, a graduate student at Stanford University, for her essay titled "A Competitive World: Ambition and Self-Help in Trollope's An Autobiography and The Three Clerks." Richardson will receive a $2000 honorarium. In addition, her essay will be published by The Fortnightly Review, which has also provided an additional monetary reward.

Richardson's essay, the judges noted, "introduces the notion of Trollope's 'comparative style,' a subtle way in which Trollope sets forth character pairs in the hopes not so much of creating a binary moral judgment as of mapping complex moral and epistemological puzzles (or even 'muddles') by moving back and forth across them, from one pole to another." The panel praised the essay for the significance of its argument and its "immersion not only in Trollope's works but in Trollope scholarship, as well as [its] depth of knowledge about Victorian culture." The panel also commended the essay's "incisive and lucid framing of a new way of thinking about the 'vacillation plot' in Trollope."

Honorable mention in the graduate competition goes to "Navigating 'A System of Shams': Publicity, Interiority, and The Warden," written by Andrew Willson, a graduate student at Yale University. The panel noted that Willson's essay focuses "on Victorian views of publicity as represented in a variety of texts, both journalistic and novelistic." The judges commended Willson's compelling essay for demonstrating Trollope's unusual treatment of publicity and its effects on interiority in The Warden.

The undergraduate prize has not been awarded this year. The Prize committee urges all professors who are teaching Trollope's works at the undergraduate level to strongly encourage their students to submit essays for next year's competition.

The judges for this year's competition were Dorice Williams Elliott, Associate Professor of English at the University of Kansas, and Deborah Denenholz Morse, Professor of English at the College of William & Mary. John Plotz, Professor of English at Brandeis University, graciously stepped in to serve as the third judge when Andrew H. Miller, Professor of English and Director of the Victorian Studies Program at Indiana University, Bloomington, needed to withdraw. All entries in the competition were read and judged anonymously with respect to both the entrants' names and their institutional affiliations.

The Trollope Prize is administered by the English department at the University of Kansas, with support from the Hall Center for the Humanities. It is awarded annually to the best undergraduate and graduate essays in English on the works of Anthony Trollope. The Prize was established to focus attention on Trollope's work and career; though he is one of the most important writers in the Victorian period and in the history of the novel, his novels are often overlooked today. The Prize is designed to help promote the study of Trollope in college classrooms and to encourage student engagement with both Trollope's work and Victorian literary history through their own intensive research and writing.

Please see our website for more information on the Prize, or e-mail any questions to trollopeprize@ku.edu. You can also now follow the Prize on Twitter at @trollopeprize.

The deadline for the coming year's competition is June 1, 2013.



The 2011 Trollope Prize Winners

We are pleased to announce the winners of the 2011 Trollope Prize in its inaugural year at the University of Kansas.

The winner of the graduate competition is "The Intensive and Extensive Worlds of Anthony Trollope's Framley Parsonage," written by Lucy Sheehan, a graduate student at Columbia University. Sheehan will receive a $2000 honorarium as well as a hardback copy of one of Trollope's novels. In addition, her essay will be published by The Fortnightly Review, which has also provided an additional monetary reward. The judges noted that Sheehan's essay successfully "enters the current critical conversation about the nature and effects of space and place in Victorian literary texts, especially how portrayals of space represent or embody ethical positions," and praised it as a "well-researched, readable, and insightful" text.

Special commendation in the graduate competition goes to "Trollope and the Hunt for West Country Identity," written by Heather Miner, a graduate student at Rice University.

The winner of the undergraduate competition is "'More awful in his silence': Speech and Male Power in Can You Forgive Her?," written by Katie Blankenau of the University of Kansas. Blankenau will receive a $1000 honorarium as well as a hardback copy of one of Trollope's novels. Her adviser is Ann Wierda Rowland. The judges called Blankenau's essay "exceptionally well-written and polished," suggesting that it read "more like a graduate student or faculty article than an undergraduate paper."

The runner-up in this year's undergraduate competition is "'The Chase of Chaldicotes is to vanish from the earth's surface': Loss of the Pastoral in Trollope's Chronicles of Barsetshire," written by Alyssa Parker of the College of William & Mary. Parker's adviser is Deborah Denenholz Morse.

The judging for this year's competition was conducted by Dorice Williams Elliott, Associate Professor of English at the University of Kansas; Andrew H. Miller, Professor of English and Director of the Victorian Studies Program at Indiana University Bloomington and co-editor of Victorian Studies; and Helena Michie, Professor of English and Agnes Cullen Arnold Professor in Humanities at Rice University. All entries in the competition were read and judged anonymously with respect to both the entrants' names and their institutional affiliations.

The Trollope Prize is administered by the English department at the University of Kansas, with support from the Hall Center for the Humanities. It is awarded annually to the best undergraduate and graduate essays in English on the works of Anthony Trollope. The Prize was established to focus attention on Trollope's work and career; though he is one of the most important writers in the Victorian period and in the history of the novel, his novels are often overlooked today. The Prize is designed to help promote the study of Trollope in college classrooms and to encourage student engagement with both Trollope's work and Victorian literary history through their own intensive research and writing.

The deadline for the coming year's competition is June 1, 2012.